If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our October Author Interviews--10/4 Wendy Tyson, 10/11 Marilyn Levinson, 10/18 Earl Javorski, 10/25 Linda Lovely. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


October Saturday Guest Bloggers: 10/7 Mark Bacon, 10/14 Elaine Orr, 10/21 WWK's Margaret S. Hamilton, 10/28 Kait Carson, and E. B. Davis 10/31 to fill out our fifth Tuesday.


WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla! Look for Carla's blog this month to find out the winner.

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thursday, September 28, 2017

The Girl Who Wrote In Silk



As I’ve mentioned before I love my two book clubs because they introduce me to books I’ve not heard of. Today I’m discussing The Girl Who Wrote In Silk by Kelli Estes, a USA Today bestseller, and I can see why it is.



The book combines the story of a Chinese girl in the late 1800s and a girl from modern times. The prologue starts with Mei Lien on a ship in Puget Sound leaving Seattle and she is thrown overboard.




Chapter one has us meeting Inara Erickson on a ferry with her sister heading for Orcas island where she and her family spent summers at their Aunt Dahlia’s home. Aunt Dahlia had recently died and left her home to Inara.

As she and her sister are exploring the house, Inara finds a piece of fabric hidden in the house that is an elaborately stitched sleeve that tells a story with pictures.

Against her father’s wishes, Inara wants to live on the island and turn the larger part of the house into a boutique hotel. He humors her at first giving her a loan to start fixing it up figuring she’ll change her mind and then she could sell it at a greater profit.

However, after finding the silk sleeve with the pictures, she contacts a professor at a Seattle university, who has a Chinese background and  teaches Chinese history. He’s fascinated by it, and together they try to research and find out who was the Chinese woman who embroidered this beautiful piece of work.


Inara (and through this book) we find out the horrors the Chinese immigrants faced in the 1800s not only in Seattle, but in the western states. 
In a conversation written with the author of this debut novel, she said that in 2002 she was researching the history of the San Juan Islands for a historical romance when she discovered a smuggler, who rather than get caught with his illegal cargo of Chinese immigrants in the 1900s chose to bash them over their heads and throw them overboard. From reading that story grew the story of Mei Lien and on to the connection Inara had through her family ancestors.



It is a powerful book, and although I’d heard the Chinese were looked down on in the past and not treated well, I had no idea of the horrors they faced. The story was both tragic at times and touching, too. Mei Lien is rescued and the man who rescues her keeps her hidden from others on the island because he knows what could happen to her if she is found. I don’t want to give too many details so all I can say is that it’s a book I highly recommend. When this blog is up, I’ll be attending the book club where it will be discussed. I’ve heard from a few who already read it how much they liked it, and I’m sure tonight it will be a very interesting discussion.

How much did you know about how the Chinese immigrants were treated in the 1800s?


v

7 comments:

Jim Jackson said...

For me, the importance of such a story isn’t in its history, of which I know a fair piece, but in its reflection of events today.

~ Jim

Margaret Turkevich said...

A good review of what promises to be an interesting read. Thanks, Gloria

Warren Bull said...

It sounds like a a page turner.

Gloria Alden said...

Jim, you're right about that. I didn't know how horrible it was until I read the book, but I do know that so many immigrants are looked down upon. In California where my daughter lives she has workers who are remodeling her kitchen who are Hispanic, and she really likes them. Also in the hospital where she works, her big (a small guy) boss is Chinese, and she works with a lot who are of different ethnics and gets along with all of them. The only one she doesn't like is a woman who is a recent hire who looks down on blacks, Hispanics and others
like that.
Margaret, it is a good read, and I'm looking forward to the discussion this evening of it at my book club.

Warren, it is. I lost a lot of sleep because I didn't want to put it down and turn out the light.

Carla Damron said...

This is intriguing. Man's inhumanity to man will always be fodder for literature. Thanks for sharing this book with us.

Gloria Alden said...

Carla, I know you'll enjoy it. I'll be choosing The Stone Necklace for both of my book clubs,
too, when it's my turn to choose a book.

KM Rockwood said...

You and your book clubs find some fascinating things to read, Gloria.

While teaching special ed in an alternative high school, we'd often read books based on things that happened in history or other cultures. Often the kids would be inspired to do some research.